7232 16mm film info

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The_kodak_kid
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7232 16mm film info

Post by The_kodak_kid » Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:06 pm

So I have several 50ft reels of Kodaks 7232 film, which expired sometime around 1952/1953... I shot some last night on my Bolex. I had the fstop set for compete darkness even though my room was fairly bright. Developed it as a negative in d-19 and fixer, and could barely see any images.

Anyone have any info on this film 7232 as I can't find anything anywhere, or if I can develop it as a negative in d-19 and fixer?

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Phil_F_NM
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Re: 7232 16mm film info

Post by Phil_F_NM » Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:57 am

Are you sure its not 1231? There is no data sheet for 7232. If it is 1232, then it is Super-XX on a nitrate base not an acetate base and the film needs to be handled carefully as over time it can degrade and spontaneously catch fire. It could also be 7222 the venerable XX which has been around since the early 1950s. The 50ft length could possibly denote its difference from 31 to 32 or it could be an internegative film possibly. Regardless, Super-XX was 100ASA if I'm doing my research correctly. If 7222 XX it was 200ASA. Subtract one stop sensitivity per decade since it became expired. Develop for the adjusted expired sensitivity. You may want to find a darkroom cookbook and learn to change your beer to account for fog.

Phil Forrest

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Phil_F_NM
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Re: 7232 16mm film info

Post by Phil_F_NM » Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:19 pm

In my above post the first number should be 1232, not 1231. I mis-typed and can no longer edit the post.
Phil Forrest

The_kodak_kid
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Re: 7232 16mm film info

Post by The_kodak_kid » Thu Jun 07, 2018 12:57 pm

Phil_F_NM wrote:
Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:57 am
Are you sure its not 1231? There is no data sheet for 7232. If it is 1232, then it is Super-XX on a nitrate base not an acetate base and the film needs to be handled carefully as over time it can degrade and spontaneously catch fire. It could also be 7222 the venerable XX which has been around since the early 1950s. The 50ft length could possibly denote its difference from 31 to 32 or it could be an internegative film possibly. Regardless, Super-XX was 100ASA if I'm doing my research correctly. If 7222 XX it was 200ASA. Subtract one stop sensitivity per decade since it became expired. Develop for the adjusted expired sensitivity. You may want to find a darkroom cookbook and learn to change your beer to account for fog.

Phil Forrest

Yes, it says 7232... and it does say super xx. The weird thing is that I developed it and there were faint images, but they seemed to be too dark. Almost as if the remjet didn’t get removed (?) hmmm

I just read the box and it says “film has an antiabrasion backing- for best results in splicing, the back should be scraped in addition to scraping of emulsion side.” It also mentions something about using cement when the above is not feasible...

The_kodak_kid
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Re: 7232 16mm film info

Post by The_kodak_kid » Thu Jun 07, 2018 12:59 pm

Phil_F_NM wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:19 pm
In my above post the first number should be 1232, not 1231. I mis-typed and can no longer edit the post.
Phil Forrest
Any recommendations on good cook books? Something for the layman =p~ :D

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Phil_F_NM
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Re: 7232 16mm film info

Post by Phil_F_NM » Thu Jun 07, 2018 1:40 pm

The_kodak_kid wrote:Any recommendations on good cook books? Something for the layman =p~ :D
Yes, The Darkroom Cookbook. By Steven Anchell. You can learn how to limit base fog from years of expiration.

Regarding the film in your previous post, there is no remjet on it. Otherwise you'd have had carbon black everywhere. To remove remjet you need a borax solution and a lot time for manual removal.

Use Google. It will help you research all this.

Phil Forrest

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