Best method for “bucket processing”?

Forum covering all aspects of small gauge cinematography! This is the main discussion forum.

Moderator: Andreas Wideroe

Post Reply
The_kodak_kid
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:22 pm
Real name: Nick

Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by The_kodak_kid » Tue Apr 10, 2018 9:38 am

I just bought a bolex h16 reflex and have some 7266 film arriving. I plan on buying a Lomo tank, but in the meantime I’m losing patience and I want to shoot and develop as soon as possible.

If anyone has any experience in “bucket processing” and knows the best way to get the best picture in these circumstances I would greatly appreciate it!!

nikonr10
Posts: 400
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2011 11:41 pm
Real name: Christopher Nigel

Re: Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by nikonr10 » Thu Apr 12, 2018 2:51 am

The_kodak_kid wrote:
Tue Apr 10, 2018 9:38 am
I just bought a bolex h16 reflex and have some 7266 film arriving. I plan on buying a Lomo tank, but in the meantime I’m losing patience and I want to shoot and develop as soon as possible.

If anyone has any experience in “bucket processing” and knows the best way to get the best picture in these circumstances I would greatly appreciate it!!
Hi ,can you give more info in what it is you like to do , have you done darkroom work ie develop films before ? as theses chemicals are no plaything in the dark ? & must be handle with care .
do you want a negative or reversal processing,
if it's reversal you need to use Bleach which is not a item you play around with as it has acid which can do alot of damage
to your skin & people around you in the dark swishing around in a bucket ?
Also where do you plan to do this processing as you will need alot of space & will be messy ? being in the dark .
On top of all this you need to shoot a test film to make sure you bolex is working so bucket processing would not help you with this for now .

The_kodak_kid
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:22 pm
Real name: Nick

Re: Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by The_kodak_kid » Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:52 am

Thank you for replying

I want to do reversal process. I also have a big enough garage to use as a dark room. There aren’t any dangerous chemicals in there, so it’s safe.

But I’m very confused with where to buy the bleach. Or the materials.



The bolex belonged to a filmmaker. It came in a pelican case with all the accessories. Also, I loaded the bolex with exposed film and it seems to take the film just fine, so I have a strong feeling it works.

User avatar
Phil_F_NM
Posts: 31
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2018 6:41 am
Real name: Philip Forrest
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Re: Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by Phil_F_NM » Fri Apr 13, 2018 2:17 pm

As Nikonr10 said, have you done classical black and white developing before? If you have experience with hand processing black and white, you know how temperamental chemistry can be.
I have over twenty years experience hand developing still black and white film and I wouldn't touch a bucket process of reversal chemistry with a 10ft pole. I just want better results, personally but more so, I don't want to worry about the handling of an aggressive carcinogen. In the dark. I wouldn't want myself nor my family or pets possibly exposed to any dichromate. I already use it in other art but it is a nasty chemical compound.
Personally, I wouldn't use reversal chemistry without a closed tank, this just from knowing how much of a sensitive pain it is with still film.
Anyway, think seriously about cleanup, contingency in case of a spill, storage and disposal of your effluent, and if all the wonky results are really worth it. Using a standard black and white negative 3 bath with rinses is easy, way less toxic and far easier to dispose of. Getting your bucket reversed for viewing is easy.

Phiil Forrest

The_kodak_kid
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:22 pm
Real name: Nick

Re: Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by The_kodak_kid » Fri Apr 13, 2018 5:15 pm

I’ve done it before at the Echo Park Film Center. So I have some experience.
I was honestly just looking for someone to point me in the right direction as far as a link, video, or a book that I’d be able to check out to learn.

I was gonna go back to the center to ask questions anyways, so that seems like my best option.

nikonr10
Posts: 400
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2011 11:41 pm
Real name: Christopher Nigel

Re: Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by nikonr10 » Fri Apr 13, 2018 6:52 pm

Phil_F_NM wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 2:17 pm
As Nikonr10 said, have you done classical black and white developing before? If you have experience with hand processing black and white, you know how temperamental chemistry can be.
I have over twenty years experience hand developing still black and white film and I wouldn't touch a bucket process of reversal chemistry with a 10ft pole. I just want better results, personally but more so, I don't want to worry about the handling of an aggressive carcinogen. In the dark. I wouldn't want myself nor my family or pets possibly exposed to any dichromate. I already use it in other art but it is a nasty chemical compound.
Personally, I wouldn't use reversal chemistry without a closed tank, this just from knowing how much of a sensitive pain it is with still film.
Anyway, think seriously about cleanup, contingency in case of a spill, storage and disposal of your effluent, and if all the wonky results are really worth it. Using a standard black and white negative 3 bath with rinses is easy, way less toxic and far easier to dispose of. Getting your bucket reversed for viewing is easy.

Phiil Forrest
Just to add to what Phil F NM .
potassium dichromate is carcinogenic and should be handled with gloves and appropriate health and safety protection. The compound is also corrosive and exposure may produce severe eye damage or blindness.[13] Human exposure further encompasses impaired fertility, heritable genetic damage and harm to unborn children.
Then you want to play in the dark with buckets ? not forgeting the acid as well .

start by learning B/W film Chemisty the dos & dont's .

The_kodak_kid
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:22 pm
Real name: Nick

Re: Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by The_kodak_kid » Fri Apr 13, 2018 10:13 pm

I’m single and I have no pets or children.

I’ve done it before at this film center near my house. So I’ve decided to go to them for advice.

Thanks again!

The_kodak_kid
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:22 pm
Real name: Nick

Re: Best method for “bucket processing”?

Post by The_kodak_kid » Wed May 23, 2018 12:46 am

nikonr10 wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 2:51 am
The_kodak_kid wrote:
Tue Apr 10, 2018 9:38 am
I just bought a bolex h16 reflex and have some 7266 film arriving. I plan on buying a Lomo tank, but in the meantime I’m losing patience and I want to shoot and develop as soon as possible.

If anyone has any experience in “bucket processing” and knows the best way to get the best picture in these circumstances I would greatly appreciate it!!
Hi ,can you give more info in what it is you like to do , have you done darkroom work ie develop films before ? as theses chemicals are no plaything in the dark ? & must be handle with care .
do you want a negative or reversal processing,
if it's reversal you need to use Bleach which is not a item you play around with as it has acid which can do alot of damage
to your skin & people around you in the dark swishing around in a bucket ?
Also where do you plan to do this processing as you will need alot of space & will be messy ? being in the dark .
On top of all this you need to shoot a test film to make sure you bolex is working so bucket processing would not help you with this for now .
https://youtu.be/NHdAi_Yyk5Q

So I successfully hand processed my film. Only thing is I agitated the film too much, which caused all those scratches. My local photo lab said that anyone who can cook can do any sort of development.

I just wanted to assure you that I did use goggles, and gloves, and that I am disposing it correctly.

I don’t know how to store r-9 bleach but my town has a once a week hazard waste disposal thing they do, which is where I’m going.

Post Reply