OT: What have you been listening to recently?

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npcoombs
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OT: What have you been listening to recently?

Post by npcoombs » Wed Oct 18, 2006 2:06 pm

I've been getting into Bonnie Prince Billy's new album, rediscovering Elliott Smith, enjoying stuff by bands like Clogs and Rachels and enjoying a bit of Latin stuff?

do you know any great stuff you want to share?

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Post by Evan Kubota » Wed Oct 18, 2006 8:15 pm

Cantopop internet radio, Mexican stuff (rock en espanol), and film scores. Specifically, Philip Glass' Mishima compositions, anything Preisner has done, and Cliff Martinez' Solaris score. And Eduard Artemiev.

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Post by keagan » Thu Oct 19, 2006 8:54 pm

A lot of Tom Waits, especially Alice and Bone Machine. A bit of Brian Eno and the Trans Siberian Orchestra (fuckin rocking if you can get your hands on them).

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Post by steve hyde » Sat Oct 21, 2006 7:33 pm

The New Pornographers, A.C. Newman, TV on the Radio, Cafe Tacuba, Fiona Apple's new record...

Steve

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Post by npcoombs » Sun Oct 22, 2006 12:51 pm

keagan wrote:the Trans Siberian Orchestra (fuckin rocking if you can get your hands on them).
They sound cool I'll check them out....

some other recommendations for the musically adventurous:

Black Ox Orchestar (jewish influenced post rock)
Tarentel (atmospheric pseudo-classical)
Iron and Wine (straight forward dirge folk)

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Post by npcoombs » Sun Oct 22, 2006 12:52 pm

Evan Kubota wrote:Cantopop internet radio, Mexican stuff (rock en espanol), and film scores. Specifically, Philip Glass' Mishima compositions, anything Preisner has done, and Cliff Martinez' Solaris score. And Eduard Artemiev.
Interesting, do you film film scores engaging by themselves?

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Post by Evan Kubota » Tue Oct 24, 2006 12:07 am

Cafe Tacuba
Yes...

Nathan - depends on the film. I had listened to 'Mishima' for a while before even seeing the film, so I'd say yes. Artemiev's work is almost as powerful separate from Tarkovsky's films. Michael Nyman is also great. I've never seen 'The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover' but for some reason I have the main theme on my hard drive.

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Post by steve hyde » Tue Oct 24, 2006 12:21 am

...One of my recording friends likes to listen to Apocalypse Now just to experience the sound mix without watching the movie....

The sirens to jungle come to mind. Wow! Walter Murch...

Steve

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Post by steve hyde » Tue Oct 24, 2006 6:48 pm

....How could I forget, our very own local wonder of a radio station here in Seattle that has recently gone from good to excellent in recent years. (and commercial free :D )......

http://www.kexp.org

streaming loud and proud worldwide. Check it out.

Steve

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Post by audadvnc » Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:16 pm

npcoombs wrote: Interesting, do you film film scores engaging by themselves?
Film music is an offshoot of what was called "program music" in the Classical era, which provided the mood without challenging the mind. Even the big boys like Beethoven and his ilk practised the art of easy listening. But that's not all bad, is it? Just because the Nutcracker Suite was accompaniment for a dance troupe doesn't diminish its value to us.

In the 20th Century, serious composers like Shostakovich and Prokofieff wrote scores for films. Unfortunately for them, a host of imitators acquired and reinvented their best themes and orchestrations, so that nowadays, much movie music sounds like "Stars on 45" medleys of earlier, better work. Love Ligetti? Burn for Brahms? Just keep listening, they'll be here shortly... or something uncannily similar.

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Post by steve hyde » Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:42 pm

audadvnc wrote:
npcoombs wrote: Interesting, do you film film scores engaging by themselves?
Film music is an offshoot of what was called "program music" in the Classical era, which provided the mood without challenging the mind. Even the big boys like Beethoven and his ilk practised the art of easy listening. But that's not all bad, is it? Just because the Nutcracker Suite was accompaniment for a dance troupe doesn't diminish its value to us.

In the 20th Century, serious composers like Shostakovich and Prokofieff wrote scores for films. Unfortunately for them, a host of imitators acquired and reinvented their best themes and orchestrations, so that nowadays, much movie music sounds like "Stars on 45" medleys of earlier, better work. Love Ligetti? Burn for Brahms? Just keep listening, they'll be here shortly... or something uncannily similar.
...interesting piece of history, Robert.....so what do you find yourself listening to these days?

Steve

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Post by Evan Kubota » Wed Oct 25, 2006 3:54 am

Film music is an offshoot of what was called "program music" in the Classical era, which provided the mood without challenging the mind.
Right, through the '30s and '40s - maybe into the '50s also. I don't think the influence was nearly as direct after that point. Quite a lot of newer film music is challenging and not 'easy' to listen to, especially from composers working outside of the orchestral context.

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Post by Evan Kubota » Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:32 am

Update. I've been listening to mostly the same stuff for months now.

John Frusciante - especially 'Smile From the Streets You Hold' and his six Record Collection albums... IMO the best songwriter alive.

Also Vincent Gallo's album 'When.'

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Post by npcoombs » Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:53 pm

Evan Kubota wrote: Also Vincent Gallo's album 'When.'
I like his 'music for movies' or whatever it was called...24 spacey musical nuggets that drift in and out of the ether...hes a much better musician than filmmaker

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Post by Evan Kubota » Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:40 pm

It's interesting that you mention that. I haven't heard his film music album but I need to check it out.

His music is almost conservative - well-crafted and decidedly 'retro.' It certainly seems to be less polarizing than his films.

You should check out 'When.' It's like '70s pop from an alternate universe.

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