Kodachrome 25, Kodachrome 40,?,?,?

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thebrowniecameraguy
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Kodachrome 25, Kodachrome 40,?,?,?

Post by thebrowniecameraguy » Sun Feb 08, 2004 8:22 am

So, what is going to happen next?

Why was Kodachrome 25 upgraded to K40, what does that mean, is it just the ASA number as the name of the film?

What can be upgraded from 40?

Is that something kodak is looking into, now that they have updated Ektachrome, Eastman Trix to Kodak Tri X and Plus X etc?

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Jordan
I'm back, I'm back- thebrowniecameraguy is back! I still have my Brownie 8mm Turret f/1.9! Time to play!

marc
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Post by marc » Sun Feb 08, 2004 8:26 am

There was never an upgrade from one to the other. As of recently, the K25 is no longer manufactured. They existed simultaneously for many years. The K 25 is a little sharper with less grain. It is an outdoor balanced film. The K 40 is a faster speed with a little less resolving power than the K25. It is balanced for tungsten light for indoor use.

woods01
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Post by woods01 » Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:07 pm

Is it just me or does anyone else find it hilarious that an indoor balanced
film has a ASA of 40!!! :wink:

Santo

Post by Santo » Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:28 pm

I threw away my twenties as a high school art teacher and I had the students each do an animated super 8 short. Must have supervised 3 or 400 of them over 5 years! All shot on K 40. Even now, after "rediscovering" super 8 a few years later, trying to use K 40 with my own projects indoors, I feel stressed out, trying to get that light meter out of the red -- even with a 1.4 lens and a 225 degree XL shutter! With (the old 50) Plus-X black and white I can cheat like crazy, mix light sources, whatever. It's fun! New 100 speed Plus-X will be even more fun. With 40 ASA indoor colour? No fun. Not without mega-lights and money for them. A 40 speed tungsten colour film is really a 25 speed outdoor film you need a filter for! :? Yeah, it's kind of funny.

FilmsUP
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Post by FilmsUP » Sun Feb 08, 2004 11:20 pm

The ASA of Kodachrome was 10 when I first shot my first roll in a Kodak ( Double 8) Brownie!

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Post by matt5791 » Mon Feb 09, 2004 12:33 pm

This is the most frustrating thing about K40 - you have to put the camera away as soon as the light drops even slightly.

I love to shoot as much film as possible and as K40 is so readily available I try to buy as much as possible. But something like Vision 200T is just so much easier to use and so much more versatile that I always opt for this or another neg stock when I have the opportunity or can afford it. You can just keep on shooting long after K40 has had to go back in the bag.

Matt
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Post by Angus » Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:18 pm

For shooting indoors you need what was called a "movie light". These were typically 1000W halogen tube lamps that you could hand hold or tripod mount...I suppose nobody makes them any more but I have one which I managed to buy new in 1988.

With one of those you can quite adequately illuminate 20 feet of a typical house room well enough to shoot with a non-XL f1.8 camera.

As for K25 and K40, they did both exist for many years together. K40 respods as a 40ASA in artificial light, but with the correct filter for daylight the speed is reduced to 25ASA - however many people who used K25 (including myself) will tell you that K25 was always just slightly more pleasing.

Kodak put K40 into super 8 cartridges and not K25 because they like all colour super 8 films to be tungsten balanced.

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Post by matt5791 » Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:37 pm

Angus wrote:For shooting indoors you need what was called a "movie light". These were typically 1000W halogen tube lamps that you could hand hold or tripod mount...I suppose nobody makes them any more but I have one which I managed to buy new in 1988.

With one of those you can quite adequately illuminate 20 feet of a typical house room well enough to shoot with a non-XL f1.8 camera.
It is not all that practical though, and also you are right at the limits of the lens aperture, and it is not all that handy walking around people with a great light on your camera - you end up looking like a news crew. If you want to use such slow stock as unobtrusively as possible indoors get some of those 500w bulbs and stick them in the light fittings in the room :twisted: (watch out they don't set on fire though)

Santo

Post by Santo » Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:44 pm

Angus wrote:For shooting indoors you need what was called a "movie light". These were typically 1000W halogen tube lamps that you could hand hold or tripod mount...I suppose nobody makes them any more but I have one which I managed to buy new in 1988.

With one of those you can quite adequately illuminate 20 feet of a typical house room well enough to shoot with a non-XL f1.8 camera.
Yes, you're right. The 250's and 500 I've got aren't enough, really. Even with 100 ASA. Before I start on a future project, I'll very likely be upgrading my lights and picking up at least one 1000W "sun gun" or "movie light". I'll probably pick up two bulbs in case of a burnout. There was a nice very professional one just up on ebay with barn doors and everything, but -- $650 US -- :? I'll find something a lot more reasonable when I start seriously looking.

10 ASA! Now that's hilarious!

Oh, just read matt's post -- I melted my desk lamp last week doing that! :lol: But while it lasted it was great! I think the way to get away with that trick is to make sure you got your house lights on a dimmer switch -- turn them up just before you shoot, down right after!

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Post by Roster » Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:57 pm

This is stretching my memory, but I seem to recall that when Super 8 was introduced, one of its conveniences was the fact that you only had to purchase one film stock for both your exterior and interior filming. It was all Type A film, however, all Super 8 cameras were to have a built in filter for exterior shooting, hence the lower ASA 25 when shooting outdoors (filter in place) and ASA 40 when shooting interiors (filter slid away from lens). When I look at my Canon 1014E, if I had the the proper light to mount on the top of the camera for interior shooting, a pin on the light mount automatically removes the filter from in front of the lens, rendering the film stock a Type A again. With the older Regular 8mm, I think you had to buy two separate film stocks, one daylight balanced and one tungsten balanced (Type A), which may have been a higher ASA (40?) than its daylight counterpart which was definitely ASA 25. Certainly some R8 model cameras had screw threads on the front of their lenses on which to attach a daylight or tungsten balanced filter if you didn't have the right film stock in the camera for the conditions you were shooting under.
"Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!"

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Post by Angus » Mon Feb 09, 2004 4:39 pm

I got my movie light new (OK it was probably a few years "old stock") in 1988 from a camera shop for £10 if memory serves...also picked up some 400' reels and a four pack of Agfa film in that shop so they obviously stocked some super 8 stuff...but that's all I remember buying from them since I was only in the area briefly visiting.

I don't think they were particularly expensive when they were new items, unlike the professional devices you get today. The disadvantage of mine is that it can only be run continuously for about 5 minutes. However the original tube lamp still works (don't know for sure if I can get a spare). I last used it at Christmas 2002. Got decent exposure for half the length of a room which is about 40 ft in total.

I made extensive use of it in the early 90's filming car restoration inside a garage at night...one shoot I forgot to remove the filter, even at 25ASA the exposure was fine - but of course the picture looks quite red! However nothing a colour correction on telecine can't solve I suppose...but looks strange on projection.

Most older std 8mm cameras with an exposure system will be calibrated for 10, 12 and 25 and 50 ASA - the last speed presumably for plus-x. I think I've seen one with 6ASA.

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