Safety when using Foma R100 kit

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nikonr10
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Real name: Christopher Nigel

Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by nikonr10 » Wed Jan 21, 2015 1:19 am

chrisgavin wrote:My DIY cine film processing efforts so far have been entirely focused on BW neg film stocks. First the Argenti Super 8, then more recently some 16mm Kodak 'Surveillance' film.
It seems to me that any reversal film and more especially, colour film involves a real step-up to more complex processing methods, higher temperatures and much nastier chemicals too.
So at the moment for BW neg film I'm happy to mix up Caffenol C-M developer, I use a water stop bath and the fixer is the only commercial photo chemical I need (I've still got loads of ancient Hypofix packets I've inherited to work my way through.)
Buying old film and processing this way, just couldn't be any cheaper and 'fun' too!
I did process some BW stills film back in the day, so this process is all very familiar and I'm fairly comfortable with it...

But... I do have quite a bit of colour negative 16mm film in my fridge. Just one day I may have to buy one of these kits and try some colour processing.
I'm trying to judge how much of a leap this might be, and also quite concerned about handling some of the chemistry involved too.
I'm curious to try colour, just very wary ...
Chris there apoint where you start ! then make the leap with out looking back , we all had to start at that point ? then it get very easy ! mistake's more with learning to load film in lomo tank ? And you save so much money in time from home cooking ,
as for what you need to look out for has been cover for on posts ! for colour neg film see tetenal colortec c 41 , have not done diy of c41 as not one for colour negative / e6 more my kind of film , check past post on forum for c41 cooking ! hope this helps .

carllooper
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by carllooper » Wed Jan 21, 2015 1:39 am

chrisgavin wrote:My DIY cine film processing efforts so far have been entirely focused on BW neg film stocks. First the Argenti Super 8, then more recently some 16mm Kodak 'Surveillance' film.
It seems to me that any reversal film and more especially, colour film involves a real step-up to more complex processing methods, higher temperatures and much nastier chemicals too.
So at the moment for BW neg film I'm happy to mix up Caffenol C-M developer, I use a water stop bath and the fixer is the only commercial photo chemical I need (I've still got loads of ancient Hypofix packets I've inherited to work my way through.)
Buying old film and processing this way, just couldn't be any cheaper and 'fun' too!
I did process some BW stills film back in the day, so this process is all very familiar and I'm fairly comfortable with it...

But... I do have quite a bit of colour negative 16mm film in my fridge. Just one day I may have to buy one of these kits and try some colour processing.
I'm trying to judge how much of a leap this might be, and also quite concerned about handling some of the chemistry involved too.
I'm curious to try colour, just very wary ...
I found colour reversal quite easy. And I'm a complete novice. I was using a kit with premixed chems so that probably helps. The only fiddly thing I found was getting the temperature right. But it wasn't a big issue. And the results were perfect (and I'm a perfectionist). I was otherwise fully expecting some bizzare result (which I've learned to appreciate just as much if not more than any conventional result). But following the directions, and the goods were delivered. Which is just as well, as the result had to be on display at an art gallery that same afternoon.

C
Carl Looper
http://artistfilmworkshop.org/

Angus
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by Angus » Thu Jan 22, 2015 3:31 pm

B&W reversal only uses one more chemical compared to B&W negative and that's the bleach. Now that dichromate bleach is more or less banned whatever they put in the developing kits is probably no worse than what some people dye their hair with. There are a couple of extra steps compared to negative developing but it's not that difficult to do B&W reversal.

E6 with a 3 bath kit is pretty simple. Chemicals are either ready to use or just require diluting usually. Get hold of some proper chemical bottles and you're fine. Watch temperatures, you want to try to get within .5C (1F) of the temperature suggested in the instructions. What I do for E6 cine film is use the Lomo spiral tank floated in water at the correct temperature in the kitchen sink. I leave the tank for 30 minutes to acclimatise keeping the water temperature reasonably constant by occasionally adding more hot water and stirring. Then when you're happy that the tank will be at the correct temperature, run through all the steps.

6 bath E6 kits are probably more difficult but I haven't tried one. I found the 3-bath kit was perfect.

C41 may well be more difficult but I haven't tried.
The government says that by 2010 30% of us will be fat....I am merely a trendsetter :)

phildil
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by phildil » Thu Jan 22, 2015 3:47 pm

Processing colour movie film yourself in a Lomo tank is doable; the chemistry is easily available for E6 colour reversal (tetenal kit for example). Modern colour neg movie film eg Kodak Vision is ECN2 process and can also be processed as C41 (also in a tetenal kit) providing you are happy with the slight colour shifts you will get as a result of the different colour developer component.

However colour neg movie film has a Remjet dry lubricant and antistat coating on its back and this must be removed as part of the processing. You will need to do a softening prebath in a borax or baking soda or similar solution and then manually remove the Remjet after the rinse stage, using a sponge or some such. In my experience this is the most difficult part of the process since avoiding contaminating the emulsion is key. Unless you are going for that "distressed" look of course.

As for chemical safety then it is just common sense. If you spill it, wipe it up; dont mix food and chemistry containers (duh!) and dont drink it. There is no need for fearing any photochemical stuff or wearing masks or respirators (!). Gloves might be handy though.

richard p. t.
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by richard p. t. » Fri Jan 23, 2015 2:55 pm

phildil wrote: There is no need for fearing any photochemical stuff or wearing masks or respirators (!). Gloves might be handy though.
Except when dealing with potassium dichromate or potassium permanganate... Or do it outside.
You should also use a respirator with paraphenylalameindiamine type developing agents such a cd2, cd3 or cd4. Yes paraphenylalameindiamine has been a common ingredient in hair dye but is less common today. Hair stylists had a higher than normal rate of kidney cancer because of exposure to it.
But as said previously just use common sense and it's no problem. I
I run Nano Lab - Australia's super8 ektachrome processing service
- visit nanolab.com.au
richard@nanolab.com.au

milesandjules
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by milesandjules » Fri Jan 23, 2015 4:13 pm

How long does tetenal c41 1litre kit last for once you have mixed it up and done ya first roll of film (i mean shelf life not how many films will it do)?

Angus
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by Angus » Fri Jan 23, 2015 9:21 pm

I've been dealing with potassium dichromate powder and solution professionally for 15 years and I just use gloves. It's quite nasty but if handled carefully poses less of a threat than mixing two household cleaners in your toilet.

But it's a moot point as you can't get it unless you're a laboratory or school these days. The days are gone when photo chemical retailers could sell it to you.
The government says that by 2010 30% of us will be fat....I am merely a trendsetter :)

freddenacka
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by freddenacka » Mon Jan 26, 2015 9:36 am

This is a bit of topic but do anyone know if there is still possible to get Kodak D19 developer?
Ora any sudgestion of any other developer sutubel fo god b/w reversal prosses?
The only possibliety as I se is tho build D19 from raw cemicals.
I was thinking of Rollei high contrast developer but have not tried that one.

Angus
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by Angus » Mon Jan 26, 2015 12:07 pm

I believe Kodak D19 was discontinued a few years ago. I was pretty pee'd off about it.

D76 is still available or you could try Ilford ID11. Either will work for B&W reversal but won't look the same as D19.
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aj
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Re: Safety when using Foma R100 kit

Post by aj » Mon Jan 26, 2015 12:09 pm

freddenacka wrote:This is a bit of topic but do anyone know if there is still possible to get Kodak D19 developer?
Ora any sudgestion of any other developer sutubel fo god b/w reversal prosses?
The only possibliety as I se is tho build D19 from raw cemicals.
I was thinking of Rollei high contrast developer but have not tried that one.
D-19 is still there. I have found plenty on Internet.
Check the research section of super8.nl Dokumol should be good.
Or get the T-max reversal developer from an alternative like the Photographer's Formulary
Kind regards,

André

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