Is there an easy answer?

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reluctantfilmmaker
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Is there an easy answer?

Post by reluctantfilmmaker » Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:45 pm

Hi all,
I've looked all over the board trying to find my answer, so if it's here, I'm sorry...here goes.

I want to shoot some double 8mm film on an old Bell & Howell Director's Series Zoomatic with dual electric eye (similar model to the Zapruder camera). I just got some 100D film from Dwaynes but there is no setting for 100 on the camera, it only goes up to 40. Is there an easy way to compensate for this? I just want to make sure the camera is set properly. I am a video guy that hasn't shot film of any kind in a long time, so I have a working knowledge, but wanted to know how I accomplish this with correct exposure? Also if anyone has some basic tips for a first timer, they would be welcome, like the filters, switches etc...

I will be shooting outdoors with either bright sunlight or sunlight.

Thanks!

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BAC
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Re: Is there an easy answer?

Post by BAC » Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:26 pm

That's the famous Zapruder Camera! I've never used that camera but even if it did go to 100 ASA I wouldn't trust the built in light meter without checking it against a working handheld light meter first. If you have an iPhone there is a free light meter app that I use that works great. If not you may want to look for a working light meter. Make sure you can set the cameras iris manually. Another option instead of a light meter is to follow the "Sunny 16 Rule". Just do a google search for "Sunny 16 Rule" and you will find a lot of information.

71er
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Re: Is there an easy answer?

Post by 71er » Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:35 pm

As far as I can see this camera has not through the lens metering but a separate "window" to measure for the correct aperture.
I would suggest that you put a ND2 filter in front of the main lens, which would have the effect that you overexpose 1/3 of a stop. This shouldn't matter too much. Using a ND4 filter will cause an underexposure of 2/3 of a stop, which you might also try as I made the experience that E100D likes underexposure more than overexposure (the colours get even richer).
Alex

Keep on Movieing!

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BAC
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Re: Is there an easy answer?

Post by BAC » Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:41 pm

If you need the owners manual it's available here: http://www.copweb.be/Zapruder%20Camera.htm Page 9 tells you how to set the iris manually.

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beamascope
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Re: Is there an easy answer?

Post by beamascope » Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:13 pm

The easy answer is buy/borrow a reliable external light meter and use it exclusively. :)

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