nizo 561macro and ektachrome 100d

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ballynally
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nizo 561macro and ektachrome 100d

Post by ballynally » Thu Sep 30, 2010 1:51 am

hello. There are quite a few topics about S8 cameras, their aperture readings, iso measuring and the new ektachrome 100d.some with conflicting outcomes, depending on the camera. Cutting it short: is there anyone who owns a Nizo 561 or 461 who has shot with the new film and knows about the automatic/manual /daylight/tungsten controls.I'm looking to shoot outdoors and can use external ND filters depending on the weather.I'm also not going to do extensive zooming or wide landscapes or fast moving.

ballynally
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Re: nizo 561macro and ektachrome 100d

Post by ballynally » Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:40 pm

here's what i got so far:

With the Nizo 801, the filter is going to be disabled no matter what by the way the cartridge is set up. And you need to set your filter switch to the sun symbol to expose 100D at 100ASA. If you leave the filter switch on the bulb setting, the camera will read it as 160ASA and under expose the film. I've been using an ND .6 filter with the 100D. That cuts 2 stops and keeps me in the f5.6-f11 range. The internal meter will compensate for an external filter, so you won't need to make any adjustments.
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I got my first 4 rolls back of the Kodak 100D carts. I used a Nizo 481 macro with the filter switch set for daylight (100ASA) and got great exposures. The colors were amazing and the grain was really tight... a real relief from 64T. Most of my shots were in overcast, so there wasn't a problem with high contrast. I used a ND .6 and cut out 2 stops for a timelapse over the Pacific Ocean. A .6 ND (effective 25ASA) is an easy solution for the higher speed in bright situations. The higher speed did produce very nice exposures for slow motion in overcast, where slower stocks tend to drop off. I'm real pleased with it, going to be shooting a lot more S8 now-

Here's how to do manual exposures on the Nizo. Turn the little exposure knob on the top left hand side of the camera to manual. When you rotate it, it will bounce all the way to the other side of the scale in the viewfinder. Don't worry. Keep rotating it, and the needle will creep back much more slowly to the left. You can fine-tune it and leave it at whatever f/stop you desire.
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or: turn knob to automatic, then watch through vf what happens. turn to manual and turn the knob to the right range.

nizo: manual, 1/2 stop underexpose
use +1 knob for more light exposure
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5.6/8 in overcast, 16/32 in bright sun, wide open in lowlight, with fine adjustments based on experience.

ballynally
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Re: nizo 561macro and ektachrome 100d

Post by ballynally » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:36 am

and:

by Davideo » Thu Sep 30, 2010 11:39 pm
(Nizo 561macro)
All shot outdoors using the Tungsten filter ( per Kodak instructions). I used auto TTL only to check what f/stop to use then I switched to manual and underexposed slightly and made my shots. No other filters used on the Nizo.

Tscan
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Re: nizo 561macro and ektachrome 100d

Post by Tscan » Sun Oct 03, 2010 1:36 am

The second post is right, The Nizo is a little different than most S8 cameras as to how it adjusts for notched carts. The Knob setting controls the 100/160 reading... sun=100ASA, bulb=160ASA
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CinemanUK
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Re: nizo 561macro and ektachrome 100d

Post by CinemanUK » Thu Oct 14, 2010 1:04 pm

Earlier this year, before Kodak marketed Ektachrome 100D, I decided to try 100D in the form sold by Wittner (marketed as Wittnerchrome 100D). Then when Kodak started marketing the stock I got some packs and had some processed with very pleasing results, but not taken with a Nizo.

Just recently I used one of the Wittnerchrome 100D cassettes on my Nizo 561 and that is so badly underexposed that there is no viewable image.

Using a Nizo 561 in excellent condition, Kodak's 100D is simple. The camera automatically reads the cassette as 100ASA and there being no filter notch the camera removes the 85 filter and so all should be well.

Now, turning to the Wittnerchrome 100D, there is quite a lot of confusing advice as to the speed at which it is notched. Some say that it is notched as is Ektachrome 100D and some say differently. I have to say that I didn't check the speed notching myself, before using the stock, and I relied on the suggestion that whilst early supplies were notched at 100T/64D, more recent supplies have been notched at 160T/100D. However on checking the cassette I had returned to me from processing against a speed notching chart, I found it to be speed notched at 100T/64D. Things were also complicated by taking advice to be found on the WWW that the filter setting should be set to tungsten so as to be sure that the internal filter is removed.

As I see it, therefore, on this basis, it seems that had I just inserted the Wittnerchrome 100D cassette and set the interal filter setting at daylight, the film would have been correctly exposed as 100D.

Nizo cameras, being different from other cameras, it seems, work on the basis that if 100D filmstock is used then setting the internal filter switch to tungsten has the effect not only of inserting the filter (even if the cassette is not filter notched) but of moving the speed setting to 160T/100D.

The result of this is that the filmstock is then exposed as though it was 160T, that is to say 2/3 stop underexposed but then, because the filter being inserted, the result is a further reduction in exposure by another 2/3 of a stop, so resulting in 1+1/3 stop under exposure.

Is this an accurate assessment of the situation?

Angus
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Re: nizo 561macro and ektachrome 100d

Post by Angus » Thu Oct 14, 2010 1:34 pm

All good to know. Haven't had my 561 out for over a year so I last used it with 64T.

Lovely little camera, one of my favourites...if a little quirky to use.
The government says that by 2010 30% of us will be fat....I am merely a trendsetter :)

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