OT: A quicky painting.....

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MovieStuff
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OT: A quicky painting.....

Post by MovieStuff » Wed Jan 02, 2008 3:39 am

Woke up today with an itch to paint so I banged out this landscape. I normally work with large canvas (about 3x5 feet) but this is only 12x16 inches. I also tried working looser and faster as an experiment. Knocked this out in a few hours.

Image

Larger version is here:

http://www.rogerevans.tv/big_tree.html

Nothing to do with Super 8 but it does have a kind of "summertime kodachrome" look to it. Very saturated with deep blacks. I'm beginning to realize that the "kodachrome" look is subconsciously working its way into all my color paintings while the "plus-x look" is showing up in my black and white paintings. Interesting.......

Anyway, enjoy.

Roger

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Post by Scotness » Wed Jan 02, 2008 5:46 am

Chuck some dinosaurs in there and it will be perfect!

Scot
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Post by marc » Wed Jan 02, 2008 5:49 am

That makes sense since many people consider Kodachrome to give an impressionist look that some artists go for with all the contrast.

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Post by electrodist » Wed Jan 02, 2008 8:28 am

Is that what it looks like in Utopia?

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Post by Actor » Wed Jan 02, 2008 11:21 am

Scotness wrote:Chuck some dinosaurs in there and it will be perfect!

Scot
I'm no expert but I don't think the vegetation depicted is consistent with the Cretaceous or Jurassic periods.

Actor

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Post by dgs8film » Wed Jan 02, 2008 11:37 am

Nice painting Roger!

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Post by Scotness » Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:10 pm

Actor wrote:
Scotness wrote:Chuck some dinosaurs in there and it will be perfect!

Scot
I'm no expert but I don't think the vegetation depicted is consistent with the Cretaceous or Jurassic periods.

Actor
Hey that never stopped Spielberg!

I only suggested it because stylistically it reminded me of those old illustrated childrens books on dinosaurs -- so like I say Roger - throw some dinosaurs on it! (And Gila Golin for that matter!!)

Scot
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Post by MovieStuff » Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:19 pm

Scotness wrote:....so like I say Roger - throw some dinosaurs on it! (And Gila Golin for that matter!!)
I'd much rather body-paint on Gila Golin. :twisted:

Would that be a Gila Monster?

(ba-da-boom!)

Thank you. Thank you. I'm here tilll Thursday......

Roger

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Post by MovieStuff » Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:22 pm

electrodist wrote:Is that what it looks like in Utopia?
Actually, it does! This was from a photo taken in the Utopia area.

Roger

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Post by jusetan » Wed Jan 02, 2008 4:22 pm

Roger, I didn't realize you were so good at quickies.

Nice work yet again. Too bad filmmaking can't be done in a couple hours eh?
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Post by steve hyde » Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:28 pm

...ok Roger wants criticism..

Roger - you are a good painter - yet I don't see you taking any risks with these paintings. To me they look like academic exercises. When are you going to take your good skills and give us your point of view?

Glad to see you are producing!

All the best,


Steve

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Post by MovieStuff » Wed Jan 02, 2008 7:18 pm

steve hyde wrote:...ok Roger wants criticism..

Roger - you are a good painter - yet I don't see you taking any risks with these paintings. To me they look like academic exercises. When are you going to take your good skills and give us your point of view?

Glad to see you are producing!
Thanks, Steve!

Well, a couple of my paintings do reflect my point of view. This one is called "The Last Roundup"

http://www.rogerevans.tv/roundup_big.html

It has a pretty obvious story behind it that reflects a passage of time, a long term partnership coming to and end and the possibility of a future apart between the two subjects. I'm not nor will ever be an "edgy" painter, I don't think, and I tend to lean toward the traditional and romantic, ala Rockwell. Thus this painting called "Waitin' on the Coffee"

http://www.rogerevans.tv/coffee_big.html

is done in the style of an old printed advertisement, like you'd find in the 20s and 30s for coffee or salt.

The one I knocked out yesterday (see above) was just to relieve an itch to paint and to see what it was like to work on a smaller canvas with more impressionistic brush strokes that a smaller canvas demands. But, since I stopped painting about 25 years ago, most of the handful of paintings I have produced over the last year are pretty much exactly what you point out; they're academic exercises designed to refine my motor skills. After all, one can not avoid painting for a quarter of a century without developing some degree of rust. Still, not every painting has to have a message or a meaning, I don't think. Sometimes it's just fun to paint and have that fun reflected in the final product. Like shooting Kodachrome 8mm for the heck of it; not because you have anything particular to say about the choice of medium, the style in which you shoot or the subject matter. It's just fun. If other people that see the final product like it, then that is great, too, but not required.

Roger

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Post by etimh » Wed Jan 02, 2008 8:35 pm

steve hyde wrote:...ok Roger wants criticism..

Roger - you are a good painter - yet I don't see you taking any risks with these paintings. To me they look like academic exercises. When are you going to take your good skills and give us your point of view?
And it is hard to critically engage works of art presented as digital thumbnails. I'm sure there is lots of nuance and interesting stuff going in Roger's work that would be hard to appreciate unless you're in front of it.

Besides, these kind of quicky sketches are essential as an artist--I did thousands (literally) of so-called "academic exercises" for every finished work I completed and was satisfied with.

Nice work, Roger. Appreciate you sharing them with us.

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Post by steve hyde » Wed Jan 02, 2008 11:39 pm

...cool that you are working on paintings. I have worked on some myself and none of them are worth showing. I agree that drawing and painting is essential for learning how to *see*..... I do see the Rockwell influence.

I think all paintings do have a *meaning*. We are always looking to see the painter behind the painting. Just like Da Vinci's sketches we see academic exercises that over time speak to history and become laden with more *meaning*.


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Post by MovieStuff » Wed Jan 02, 2008 11:56 pm

steve hyde wrote:...cool that you are working on paintings. I have worked on some myself and none of them are worth showing. I agree that drawing and painting is essential for learning how to *see*..... I do see the Rockwell influence.
Some artists would not consider that a compliment but I do. Thanks.

steve hyde wrote: I think all paintings do have a *meaning*. We are always looking to see the painter behind the painting. Just like Da Vinci's sketches we see academic exercises that over time speak to history and become laden with more *meaning*.
I would agree that all paintings have a meaning but the meaning might not be obvious at the time of execution and/or the artist's meaning might not sync with the viewer's interpretation. Even then, the passage of time can often alter the perception and meaning of a piece. Much of what we hold dear as "classic" fine works from history were really just commercial art pieces created to fund nothing more than the next meal and a warm place to sleep, with the artist often having to choose between the two.

I don't know that I even put that much thought into my work. I just like to paint. One of the joys of art is that you can create it in a void of intent. If someone sees a deeper meaning in my paintings, they might be working harder viewing it than I did painting it! ;)

Roger

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