Kodakchrome 25

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digvid
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Kodakchrome 25

Post by digvid » Sun Oct 30, 2005 2:48 am

I have found a roll of exposed Regular 8mm film from about 1982. It was stored away in a camera all these years. It is Kodachrome 25 daylight-balanced 8mm film. Is there any chance that images would have survived on this film? Is it worth having it developed? Does Dwayne's (or anyone) still develop Kodachrome 25?

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gianni1
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Post by gianni1 » Sun Oct 30, 2005 2:23 am

Go for it, but not for a client. Home movies, art, is ok. I have recently used some of that stuff, it's ok. Maybe bracket the takes, treat it as both 25 and 10 asa. Needs bright sunlight, try some Halloween portraits in the autumn leaves at sunset... Maybe you'll see the 8mm Goddess!

Gianni

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monobath
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Post by monobath » Sun Oct 30, 2005 2:45 am

If it is Kodachrome 25 and not Kodachrome II, then it is the normal K-14 process and Dwayne's can process it. If it is Kodachrome II, then it is K-12 process, and no one can process it as a color reversal, but Rocky Mountain Film Lab can process it to black and white negative. However, they say it takes them 6 months to a year to do it.

Kodachrome II was no longer produced since about 1974, I think, but it was still processed by Kodak through about 1983. If you are sure your film is not Kodachrome II, send it to Dwayne's.
Skip

digvid
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K25

Post by digvid » Sun Oct 30, 2005 3:34 am

I have reason to believe that it really is K25. There was a piece of the original film box that was torn off and stuck into a part of the camera, apparently to show what type of film was currently in use. The box clearly says "Kodachrome 25" on it. That is good news--I will send it off for processing with a roll of Regular8 K40 I recently shot, just in case there are some usable images on it.

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mr8mm
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Post by mr8mm » Sun Oct 30, 2005 6:18 am

To be certain that you have KM25 and not KII, pull out about 6 inches of the film and look at the pattern made by the punched holes. Kodachrome II will have the pattern "KII" punched into the film. Kodachrome 25 will have "KM" punched into the film or the number "7267".

Good luck.

J.S.

digvid
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Pattern

Post by digvid » Sun Oct 30, 2005 9:38 am

It has punched holes reading "KM". Thanks!

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Angus
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Post by Angus » Sun Oct 30, 2005 10:11 am

I recently had a roll of K25 dated 1978 processed. It had been exposed and left in a camera I bought. Being in the UK I was able to simply send it to Swizerland and have it processed for free.

The result? Crystal clear images of somebody's child on the beach...and it seems they finished off the reel by shooting their washing line in the back garden and under exposed shots of their projector indoors.

You have little to lose by having an exposed reel processed. I could see finger prints on this particular roll on both ends so I figured it had been exposed but never processed.

I have four rolls of K25 dated 1978 to 1990 that I shall be shooting in the coming few months...all should yield some sort of images but you never know how film will respond. Normally unexposed film loses sensitivity.
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