Animation

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Nolan

Animation

Post by Nolan » Sun May 19, 2002 6:53 pm

i have a Canon AF310Xl-S which cannot shoot single frame can I still attempt animation or will it look to jumpy shooting afew frames at a time?

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Andreas Wideroe
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Post by Andreas Wideroe » Mon May 20, 2002 7:11 pm

Hi Nolan!
It will most likely look jumpy and not too good. I suggest you buy a cheap camera that can shoot single frames and use this one instead. I'm sure you can easily get a camera like that on eBay for about $25.

Good luck!
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Post by CHAS » Mon May 20, 2002 8:56 pm

I must disagree. I've been using a Bolex 155 for years and it doesn't have single-frame capabilities. I use either a cable release which helps some or just press the trigger quickly. It comes out really well with some practice. I do stop-motion animation with 12" action figures and for that I move everything as slowly as possible to get a real smooth look.

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Post by Andreas Wideroe » Mon May 20, 2002 11:35 pm

I guess you're right Chas - with some practise I'm sure you're able to get a decent animation, but still, I guess single frame is the ultimate way to go?

By the way, aproximatly how many frames do you expose each time you press the trigger (Chas)?
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Post by Guest » Mon May 20, 2002 11:52 pm

I guess single-frame would be preferable but what I'm trying to say is that it shouldn't limit you if you don't have a single-frame camera.

IMHO, the most important things are focus and story. If you don't have either then your final product is crap regardless of whether or not you have correctly done single frame throughout your piece (and I could go on about S8 film fests where people with much better cameras than mine have produced the biggest piles of shit but I won't bore you here).

I never really noticed how many frames it took -- my guess is around 2 -- I've gotten it down to looking really fluid regardless.

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Single Frames

Post by StopMoWorks » Tue May 21, 2002 4:07 am

Well, I have been involved with stop motion animation for a number of years. If you are a beginner and just learning, or your budget is very limited and you cannot afford a camera with "single frame" feature, then maybe...... okay......and attempt your animation by shooting 'wild' (without single frames).

If you ever want to get into animation in a more serious way, then one must have the most basic feature which is the ability to shoot "single frames".......you have ultimate control of the frame-to-frame incremental animation movements.......and you can break down or calculate your animation based on 24fps or 30fps. I am guessing, your animation is acceptable to you, but for more professional results, it is recommended you use a camera with single frame capability. You will advance yourself much more in the practice of animation.

I am only speaking in terms of doing animation that is more finessed and smooth. If you are happy with your results, then continue on ! :)

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